Food, Travel

A Visit to Les Anis de Flavigny

Situated in the Côte-d’Or, in the Auxois region of Burgundy, is a little village called Flavigny-sur-Ozerain.

Just another quaint little French village?

Just another quaint little French village?

Home to just 340 residents, Flavigny is nestled deeply in the French countryside and may pass as a nondescript village if not for the fact that its reputation far surpasses it. The entire town is dotted with historical monuments, including its medieval fortifications, the architecture of artisans like glass-blowers, wine-makers, tanners, weavers, millers, etc, and a Benedictine crypt, earning it the accolade of l’un des plus beaux villages de France, or “one of the most beautiful villages of France”.

The Americans may also know it better as: the village where they filmed the movie Chocolat, yes the one with Johnny Depp in it.

True story.

Although Flavigny may be known as “that chocolate village”, it is in fact, better known for another type of candy – the Anis de Flavigny. For those who aren’t familiar, these are aniseeds coated in sugar and flavoured with an assortment of aromes.

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Visitors could try samples in the boutique before making a decision to buy. From popular flavours like lemon, orange, mint and rose, to the more exotic aniseed, ginger and licorice, there’s something for everyone.

The visit to the factory did not permit photography, but here’s a picture of the building from the exterior:

Guided tours are conducted in French, free of charge to attend, and only takes about 10 to 15 minutes.

Guided tours are conducted in French, free of charge to attend, and only takes about 10 to 15 minutes.

The factory is also home to an ancient Benedictine crypt, where the monks dedicated their lives to prayer, studies and hard work. These monks practised a peculiar “ritual” (if you will), where they’d chant nonstop 24 hours. There must have been a system where the monks rotated and chanted in shifts. At any rate, one would hear music round the clock.

As previously noted, the French are partial to their sweets, so it should come as no surprise that the boutique offered up an assortment of lollies.

Sugar rush!

Sugar rush!

And of course, there was chocolate.

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