Food, Travel

Eating and Drinking Marseille

This is a photo collection and summary of the Ninja Turtle and GodzillaPin’s dining adventures in Marseille. They received no recompense in any form whatsoever for what they are about to write. It’s all in the name of information sharing, to help other travellers make better choices. So, one of the main reasons why Marseille was so exciting, despite the terrible weather, was because as a grande ville, the dining options were far more varied and interesting than the handful of eateries in Metz.

Here, one could find food that was not-French-cuisine. Here, breakfast needn’t necessarily be croissants and orange juice. As the duo had explored Marseille’s markets in a previous trip, their food focus this time round was mainly on restaurants. (That said, they did quickly wander through Noailles to buy nuts, spices, teas, herbs and olives to carry back to Metz.) The first restaurant they dined in was L’Ecailler, one of the several restaurants on Rue Saint-Saëns that offered a 15€ menu of entrée, plat, dessert.

It’s one of those restaurants where there’s a server permanently parked at the door hustling people to come in, but service inside can be painfully slow. The place was packed to the brim though, so the duo will acknowledge that. GodzillaPin was embarrassed at the end of the meal when the waiter told him their card machine was not working and he had to go hunt down an ATM to withdraw some cash. The food was OK but the overall experience wasn’t great, so there will be no repeat visits to this place.

Dinner that night was at a chic establishment called Les Akolytes. Right on the corner of Rue Papety and Rue des Catalans, it has an air of recent refurbishment. This was the meal before the marathon, and when GodzillaPin told the Ninja Turtle that it was a tapas-style dinner, she worried for a while that she wouldn’t have enough to eat.

Menu board at Les Akolytes. Each person chose two or three dishes, but they were all for sharing.

Menu board at Les Akolytes. Each person chose two or three dishes, but they were all for sharing. Everything looked so darn delicious!

The Ninja Turtle’s fears were unfounded. The portions were generous and hey, in France, one could always fill up on bread. Carb-loading, right?

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In retrospect, this was by far hands down the winning meal of the whole trip. The ambiance in the restaurant made it perfect for romantic dinners, gatherings or special occasions, and the food was superb. The waiting time was a bit long, but it was a one-man-show in the kitchen and totally worth the wait. Definitely going back the next time they return to Marseille.

Post-marathon, the Ninja Turtle filled up on plenty of raisins, bananas, and oranges, so it wasn’t until 3pm that the duo went out hunting for lunch. On a Sunday, that doesn’t bide well. At all. Most restaurants stop service at 2.30pm. In the end, it was back to Rue Saint-Saëns, but this time, they really couldn’t stomach another tourist-trap meal, so it was back to the trusty old standby:

Hey, after running 26.2 miles, one is entitled to eat anything one desires. There is nothing wrong with a humble lamb kebab.

Hey, after running 26.2 miles, one is entitled to eat anything one desires. There is nothing wrong with a humble lamb kebab.

Later that evening, it was a long and windy uphill hike from their hotel to dinner. The restaurant was called Adonis du Liban, and while the service was slightly awkward, the food kept on coming. They started with a Lebanese soup of lentils and freekeh (not pictured because it looked horrendous but tasted not too bad), and proceeded to the following:

Also ordered a half-bottle of rosé wine to celebrate.

Also ordered a half-bottle of rosé wine to celebrate.

They almost had to beg for mercy when the shish taouk served with a Lebanese rice pilaf showed up at the table. That said, it was a really delicious meal and worth the effort of getting to the restaurant. Various online reviews also claim that it’s super authentic as far as Lebanese cuisine goes. The duo aren’t experts in Lebanese food, but they’d happily recommend this place.

Of course, there’s always room for dessert, and as the couple walked along Vieux Port, one of the various ice cream parlours caught their eye.

OK fine, Italian gelati. They chose amarena (cherry), tiramisu, marron glacé (glazed chestnut) and nocciola (hazelnut).

Fine it’s not ice cream, it’s Italian gelati. They chose amarena (cherry), tiramisu, marron glacé (glazed chestnut) and nocciola (hazelnut).

Monday lunch was at a little dining place called SO… Marseille on the other side of the port. In fact, the duo have eaten at this place two years ago, on their first visit to Marseille. It wasn’t intentional, they’d just forgotten they’d been here before, which was strange because the Ninja Turtle had happy memories flooding back as soon as she sat down.

Lunch was called a tasting platter of 8 tapas, but it was really more like a giant super-loaded salad drenched in lots of olive oil.

Lunch was called a tasting platter of 8 tapas, but it was really more like a giant super-loaded salad drenched in lots of olive oil.

Can you feel the sunshine on your skin and smell the Mediterranean just by looking at this food? It tasted of holidays.

Can you feel the sunshine on your skin and smell the Mediterranean just by looking at this food? It tasted of holidays.

Some may consider this a bit touristy, but the duo didn’t mind. The food was exactly what they came to south of France for, and the service was simply marvellous. The waitress was super-friendly and helpful, plus dessert was amazing:

Tiramisu and a macaron au chocolat with raspberry coulis.

Tiramisu and a macaron au chocolat with raspberry coulis.

One can probably make a pretty accurate guess at the tourism statistics of Marseille simply by looking at the number of British pubs that line Vieux Port. O’Malleys, The Queen Victoria, The Shamrock Irish Pub… you get the idea. It looks like the local Marseillais(es) have no problems assimilating the drinking culture into their own lifestyle though.

A beer pong tournament every Tuesday. Winners are entitled to an open bar.

A beer pong tournament every Tuesday. Winners are entitled to an open bar.

The final meal in Marseille on Monday night was at Le Grand Baie. Being completely unfamiliar with Mauritius cuisine, the duo didn’t quite know what to expect. Turns out, the little cosmopolitan island is quite the melting pot of cultures, and this blend of Creole, Indian, Chinese and European flavours is reflected in its culinary offerings.

Don't remember the names of these, but they were very much like Chinese shiu mai, Indian samosa, Portugese filetes de peixe and something incredibly crunchy but unidentifiable.

Don’t remember the names of these, but they were very much like Chinese shiu mai, Indian samosa, Portugese filetes de peixe and something incredibly crunchy but unidentifiable.

The owner was a really friendly man who was hell-bent on re-creating Mauritius for his diners. It was lashing with wind and rain outside, but inside, he cranked the heating right up, and served the alcoholic beverages with a very liberal hand. The aperitifs at 4€ were comparable in price to most other restaurants, but here, Daniel served up DOUBLE the quantity.

The Ninja Turtle went with a gambas curry for her main course, and was delighted with the size of the crustaceans in her dish.

The Ninja Turtle went with a gambas curry for her main course, and was delighted with the size of the crustaceans in her dish.

While GodzillaPin went with a fish curry that was salty, spicy and citrusy all at once.

While GodzillaPin went with a fish curry that was salty, spicy and citrusy all at once.

The curries were served with kidney beans, rice and a token dish of vegetables.

For dessert, a flambéed banana split with coconut ice cream, and of course, flambéed with generous slugs of rum.

For dessert, a banana split with coconut ice cream chantilly cream, and of course,  generous slugs of rum.

They could hardly finish their meal, there was just so much food. Although it was not as impressive as the food at Les Akolytes, the duo found this meal to be the best dining experience, between the friendliness and generosity of the owner, and the novelty of trying a completely new cuisine.

And there you have it, the round up on the duo’s eating adventures in Marseille, and a couple of recommendations based on their favourite experiences.

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2 thoughts on “Eating and Drinking Marseille

  1. Gee thanks, you have now left me with severe food envy on the eve of a 3 day trek where our meals will be pretty much limited to freeze dried rations and instant noodles. Gonna have to work hard to erase those delicious images from my mind!

    Oh, not quite related, but I forgot to do this previously, so a belated congratulations on your marathon!

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